CfP: Architectural Theory Review. Terms and Conditions: Financialized Space

Call for Papers: Architectural Theory Review. Terms and Conditions: Financialized Space

This issue of Architectural Theory Review investigates the relation between finance capital and architecture. In particular, we seek contributions that explore previously overlooked situations in which the terms and conditions of finance have had spatial and architectural effects. In this way, the issue aligns itself with the argument recently reiterated by Sara Stevens and Lauren Jacobi, among others, that spaces of finance—banks, corporate headquarters and other sites of exchange—have been inadequately addressed by historians of architecture. In keeping with this argument, we propose that the movement of money and capital from financial institutions, into markets, and vice versa, delineates a more comprehensive architectural history in which the terms and conditions of finance are read against the spatial formations they have facilitated. In short: how do financial systems and practices become legible by attending to architecture as a form of evidence? And what more can be said about architecture by figuring finance into its conceptualization and/or realization?

Submissions of 4000-8000 words can be submitted to Maren Koehler (maren.koehler@sydney.edu.au) or Jasper Ludewig (jasper.ludewig@newcastle.edu.au) for double-blind review by 15 October, 2021

More information can be found in the full call for papers here.

Share this post

News from the field

EAHN Building Word Image Group: Actors at the Margins

Online Seminar Series, October - December 2021 A series of dialogues, initiated by the EAHN Group Building Word Image, shedding light on groups or individuals acting at and from the margins of the realm of architecture. Through these seminars, through multivocal and...

Ardeth Magazine 10: COMPETENCY

The etymology of competency (English), competenza (Italian), and competence (French) derives from the Latin word competentia, which means “meeting together, in agreement and symmetry”. Competens, the present participle of the Latin verb competere, has been used to...